National/Personal Rivalries in the Third Crusade: Richard I goes tête-à-tête with Philip II Augustus

The Third Crusade captured the imaginations of its contemporaries and has continued to be perhaps the most famous of all the crusades in the public mind. When you think of crusaders, to most people the image of Richard the Lionheart immediately spring to mind, perhaps Philip Augustus and Frederick I as well. So why did … Continue reading National/Personal Rivalries in the Third Crusade: Richard I goes tête-à-tête with Philip II Augustus

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The Survival of Duke William II in Normandy: 1035-57

The twenty-two-year period that this post looks at were, I think it safe to say, not only years of extreme difficulty and hardship for William and Normandy, but perhaps years that while we cannot say for certain they shaped him completely, they must have helped forge him into the Conqueror of popular imagination: a hard … Continue reading The Survival of Duke William II in Normandy: 1035-57

“A Vicious Man”: Understanding the Massacre at Acre

From August 1189 until the 12th July 1191, the port city of Acre, located on its peninsula in the Gulf of Haifa, had been besieged. First by a somewhat ragtag band of approximately 3000 men led by the technically still king of Jerusalem Guy de Lusignan, then from April and June, Philip II Augustus of … Continue reading “A Vicious Man”: Understanding the Massacre at Acre

Æthelwulf, King of Wessex

"...and Æthelwulf, Egbert's offspring, succeeded to the kingdom of Wessex, and he granted his son Æthelstan the kingdom of the inhabitants of Kent and the East Saxons and Surrey and South Saxons." Part 6 of our ramble through the monarchy of (geographically speaking at least) England, is finally here! This time it's all about Æthelwulf … Continue reading Æthelwulf, King of Wessex